Our Baby for Mothers and Nurses

Our Baby: For Mothers & Nurses

By Mrs J Langton Hewer

Whilst we are all working from home and away from the collections I thought it would be an opportunity to share a few things from the collections digitally.

Saying that, however, I am starting with an item which is not part of our accessioned collections yet! This is a lovely book which was discovered in a family member’s bookshelf which we are hoping to use in a display later this year.

It was written by Mrs J Langton Hewer, a certified midwife and is aimed at mothers and nurses. Though it was first published in 1891 this is a later edition published in 1920. It is not a rare book by any means, hundreds of thousands of copies were published until at least the late 1930s. But it is a fascinating insight into domestic life and social history of the time, even more so as we know it was used and read by so many people.

Unfortunately, I have not been able to find anything out about the author of the book, other than what it says on the title page, that she was a certified midwife and late hospital ward sister.

The front and back of the book are filled with adverts for a range of products from Bourneville Cocoa to Bailey’s Accouchement Sets, Primrose soap and Harringtons Hygienic Squares.

Chapters cover baby care such as washing, bathing and an entire chapter on ‘What shall I dress baby in’, sleep, feeding, accidents and a chapter on being a baby’s nurse.

There is an interesting section on ‘infectious fevers’ which still includes small-pox. Whilst vaccination had been essentially compulsory since 1873 and it was considered rare by 1920 it was still a possibility.

 

There is an interesting section on ‘infectious fevers’ which still includes small-pox. Whilst vaccination had been essentially compulsory since 1873 and it was considered rare by 1920 it was still a possibility.

An interesting insight into how baby-care has changed in 100 years.

 

Our Baby: For Mothers and Nurses

by Mrs J Langton-Hewer

Illustrated, 16th edition, 140th thousand

1920

 

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